INJURY AT SEA IS OPEN FOR BUSINESS. Our staff is working remotely until further notice to help protect our employees, clients, and our communities from the novel coronavirus (COVID-19). Our legal team will be answering calls, voicemail, and email, and will conduct all business by telephone, video conference, email or other electronic means. IF YOU HAVE BEEN INJURED AT SEA WE ARE STILL HERE TO HELP! We are still available 24/7 to talk about your case. We appreciate your patience until we are able to resume full and normal operations of all of our offices. We will get through this together!

Tug Crew Rescued

Five crewmembers from the POLAR WIND were rescued after the tug its barge went aground.

The Northland Services tug was 20 miles from Cold Bay when it became separated from the barge. The two vessels drifted while the crew was trying to reconnect the towline.

The Coast Guard received a distress call at around 9pm on Tuesday, and responded with two helicopters. According to Coast Guard Petty Officer David Mosley, weather was a factor. Mosley says that the rescue was made five hours later, and had to be completed in two rounds.

Having rescued the crew of the POLAR WIND, the Coast Guard and the Department of Environmental Conservation are now working to reduce the impact to Alaska’s coastline. The tug and barge were carrying more than 23,000 gallons of diesel fuel at the time of the grounding along with smaller amounts of lube oil and other petroleum-based products. The barge was also carrying 90 refrigerated containers, 30 of which were in use. The contents of these containers have not been disclosed and the Coast Guard is waiting for a cargo manifest.

Contact Information