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Two people were saved and a sinking averted 15 miles north of the Grays Harbor entrance, in Washington, Saturday morning.

Boat crews aboard a 47-foot Motor Life Boat and a 29-foot Response Boat passed the boaters a dewatering pump that was able to keep up with the flooding as they escorted the vessel to shore. Conditions were mild, 2 to 4-foot seas and winds were 5 to 10 mph from the northwest.

The operator of a 22-foot pleasure craft reporting their boat taking on water. The Station Grays Harbor boat crews arrived on scene first and two crewmembers boarded the vessel taking on water, passed over a radio and a P-6 dewatering pump.

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The master of the pleasure craft Alaska Song had a heart attack while anchored in Takatz Bay near Baranof Island. Due to low visibility, the Jayhawk crew was unable to hoist the master of the Alaska Song from the anchored location. Sector Juneau watchstanders contacted the crew of the good Samaritan vessel Sea Lion to transport the man to Chatham Strait. He was hoisted in Chatham Strait near Angoon and transferred to awaiting emergency medical services

The crew reported that the master had been treated by an onboard cardiologist but was in unstable condition. Watchstanders diverted a Jayhawk crew responding to the tug Justine Foss and requested the recall and launch of a second Jayhawk crew.

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A 67-year-old male crewmember was hoisted from the tug Justine Foss 62 miles south of Yakutat.

Coast Guard Seventeenth District watchstanders received a report from Health Force Partners that a crewmember on the tug Justine Foss was suffering from a possible detached retina. Coast Guard Sector Juneau launched a Jayhawk helicopter to transport the crew to medical facilities.

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Coast Guard Air Station Kodiak helicopter crew medevaced a 26-year-old crew-woman from the fishing vessel Seattle Enterprise 140 miles northwest of Unalaska, Alaska, Tuesday.

The Dolphin crew safely hoisted the woman who was experiencing chest pressure in 20mph winds and 6 ft seas and transported her to awaiting emergency medical personnel in Unalaska.

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Two men were rescued from a skiff near Nome, Alaska, after their dredge sank Wednesday.

An Alex Haley small-boat crew rescued the men from a skiff after being signaled by the light of a personal locator beacon. The small-boat crew transferred the men to Nome.

The men reported that the dredge sank quickly in 25 mph winds and 6ft seas and they both were in the water. They were both wearing life jackets and were able to cut the line holding the skiff to the dredge as it sank. The Coast Guard Alex Haley crew reported the men were cold and wet and given minor first aid treatment but suffered no injuries.

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The U.S. Coast Guard, the Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation and the city of Unalaska established a unified command in response to potential pollution from the fishing vessel Akutan near Unalaska, Alaska, Friday.

Personnel from Coast Guard Sector Anchorage, the State of Alaska, the city of Unalaska and Resolve Marine Services, a salvage and repair company, are coordinating and overseeing the removal of environmental hazards, including anhydrous ammonia and various petroleum products onboard the fishing vessel Akutan.

The unified command determined the steps taken by the vessel owner and operator as inadequate to prevent a potential pollution incident. The approximately 166-foot fishing vessel began transiting to Dutch Harbor from Bristol Bay earlier this month. Due to various mechanical issues the vessel anchored in Captains Bay where it remains, deteriorating.

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Fishing vessel, the 48ft Pura Vida and its three person crew is being towed by a Coast Guard boat crew in 6-8ft swells with an estimated time of arrival to the Columbia River of 6 p.m., Tuesday.

Tuesday morning the commercial fishing vessel Pura Vida reported it was taking on water 66 miles west of Tillamook Head. Coast Guard and Good Samaritan vessel Western Edge delivered a total of three dewatering pumps saving the boat and the crew.

The Coast Guard had issued an urgent marine information broadcast requesting assistance from mariners in the vicinity on behalf of the crew of the Pura Vida, which was answered by multiple commercial fishing vessels and two U.S. Navy warships.

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Coast Guard crews rescued a 67-year-old mariner after his yacht collided with an unknown object and sank 9 miles off Leadbetter Point State Park, Washington, Friday.

The mariner reported his vessel, the 45-foot pleasure yacht Sea Crest, had struck an unknown object and was taking on water. He reported that during the collision he hit his head and may have lost consciousness, but was not sure for how long. Water was coming into the deck scuppers.

As the sole person aboard, the mariner abandoned ship into his 17-foot yacht tender with a life jacket, survival suit and flares. Shortly after he called for help on channel 16, he reportedly lost sight of the lights of the Sea Crest and heard sounds that indicated the vessel might have sunk.

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A crewman suffering chest pain and symptoms of a stroke was hoisted from the F/V Kindred Spirit Wednesday in Stephens Passage near Port Snettisham.

The Coast Guard crew hoisted the crewman safely and transported him to Juneau for further medical care.

The hoist was reported as “one of the most challenging we have done” due to the vessel configuration and the conditions at the time.

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A biologist for the Alaska Department of Fish and Game raised the alarm that the 43-foot gill netter Transit was disabled in the surf and taking on water. The master of the Transit shot off red flares and stayed with the vessel. Two good Samaritan vessels arrived on scene to render assistance but were unable due to surf conditions.

A Coast Guard helicopter crew rescued the man from the fishing vessel approximately 14 miles north of Port Moller near Kodiak Island, and transported him to Port Moller.

“This mariner aided his rescue by wearing a survival suit, using a signaling device and staying with his vessel,” said Lt. Dan Hendricks, command duty officer for the 17th District. “Those three elements combined with the prompt notification by the Fish and Game biologist allowed us to remove him from harm’s way.”