MARITIME CASUALTY - WHAT WENT WRONG AND WHY

Our mission is to investigate and discover the facts and real reason for marine casualties what really happened and why. For years we have gone beyond the headlines and looked for real answers.

Articles Posted in Merchant Mariner

A Coast Guard helicopter medevaced a sick mariner from the bulk carrier Restinga, Wednesday, near Cold Bay. The Crewman was showing symptoms of likely suffering from a stroke.

The Jones Act has complex provisions to ensure that working conditions are safe, including helping rescue services transport sick or injured mariners. It pays to consult a qualified experienced attorney to discuss your rights and possible compensation in case of sickness or injury at sea, or dockside.

Coast Guard watchstanders received a 1pm call from the Alaska Maritime Agency in Dutch Harbor reporting the individual was suffering from a possible stroke while the vessel was 140 miles south of Dutch Harbor.

The aircrew safely transported the 42-year-old male to Dutch Harbor, where they conducted a wing-to-wing transfer with a LifeMed crew, who then transported him to Anchorage for further care.

“Two assets were used to complete the medevac due to the vessel’s distance offshore,” said Petty Officer 1st Class Dustin Lake, an operations specialist stationed at the command center in Juneau. “The MH-60 was the asset conducting the hoist while the C-130 was there as a communications platform. In the event something happened to the helicopter, they would be there to drop lifesaving rescue equipment. Having a secondary aircraft is a common procedure in the Coast Guard and reduces the risk during operations conducted so far offshore.”

Contact an experienced attorney to discuss any such injury or illness related to maritime situations. It pays to know your rights.

by Tom Evans, Injury at Sea. Continue Reading

A sightseeing plane, with five passengers from a Holland America Line cruise from Seattle, crashed Thursday in southeast Alaska, killing all six people on board.

This is considered a maritime/admiralty matter cover by the Jones Act. Maritime employees are covered by the Jones Act/General maritime law and also passengers, although not seaman, are entitled to some maritime protections.

Reportedly the plane’s emergency alert beacon was activated around 11:20 a.m. in the area of Misty Fjords National Monument, near Ketchikan. A helicopter reported seeing wreckage on a ridgeline in the search area, and Coast Guard crew members found the wreckage around 2:40 p.m.

The aircraft involved is a float plane owned by Southeast Aviation LLC, a company that provides flightseeing tours as well as air charter services to other Southeast Alaska communities, according to its website. Holland America Line says the five passengers on the flight were from the company’s cruise ship Nieuw Amsterdam, which departed from Seattle on July 31 and stopped in Ketchikan on Thursday.

It takes experienced expert maritime attorneys to represent seamen and passengers who may be due compensation under the Jones act. The Jones Act is specific Maritime Law that is complex to interpret and apply, and applies to seaman and passengers in specific cases. It takes experts to fully investigate the circumstances of the maritime injury or death and experienced maritime attorneys to determine how much compensation may be due to the victims and their families in case of injury or loss of life.

by Tom Evans, Injury at Sea. Continue Reading

A Coast Guard helicopter medevaced a crewman from the fishing vessel Alaska Ocean Sunday approximately 30 miles northeast of Cold Bay, Alaska, with a crush injury to his arm.

News of the arm injury aboard the fishing vessel Alaska Ocean came in at at approximately 7 p.m. asking medical assistance for the 45-year-old crew member who suffered arm crush injury.

The Alaska Ocean was 60 miles from Cold Bay during the initial call for help. Watchstanders directed the launch of the Jayhawk aircrew from the Forward Operating Location Cold Bay.

The Jayhawk aircrew hoisted the man at approximately 10:30 p.m. and transferred him to the local Cold Bay medical clinic to wait for further transport to Anchorage.

Such injuries can mean that life as a fisherman is ended and the injured person may no longer be able to work aboard ship. Expenses for treating the injury may be only the beginning as retraining for another job on shore can be life changing and expensive. It is important to know your rights and get expert advice to avoid the potentially devastating consequences of an injury at sea.

by Tom Evans, Injury at Sea. Continue Reading

A Coast Guard aircrew medevaced a crewman Monday suffering a severe hand and leg injury aboard a commercial freighter 135 miles off the Washington coast.

Canadian dispatch in Victoria contacted US Coast Guard at 9:30 a.m., reporting a 39-year-old crewman had injured his hand and leg by falling. The vessel was 135 miles west of Cape Flattery en route to China.

At approximately 12:30 p.m. the injured crewman was hoisted and proceeded to Astoria, Oregon, where he was transferred to emergency medical services personnel at the airport just after 2 p.m.

Slip and fall incidents may often be caused by poor working conditions, inadequate protective gear, or the state of repair of important equipment on board, and resulting injuries can receive compensation payments.

by Tom Evans, Injury at Sea. Continue Reading

The Coast Guard medevaced a crewmember from the 653-foot merchant vessel Morning Peace approximately 130 miles southwest of Dutch Harbor, Alaska, Thursday. The 48 year old crewmwmber was reportedly experiencing symptoms of appendicitis.

The Jayhawk helicopter aircrew hoisted the man and transferred him to awaiting commercial medevac services in Dutch Harbor for further transport to Anchorage.

Initially 530 miles south of Unalaska Island, Morning Peace proceeded toward Dutch Harbor throughout the night to close the distance. The Jayhawk aircrew launched from Cordova at 8:30 p.m. and arrived in Dutch Harbor at 7:21 a.m. Thursday morning after refueling in Cold Bay.

by Tom Evans, Injury at Sea. Continue Reading

American Seafoods reports that 86 crew of the 272-foot trawler, American Dynasty, which carries up to 142 crew, have tested positive for COVID-19. The American Dynasty has returned to its homeport of Seattle and is currently on lockdown. Crew members are in quarantine and being monitored by medical personnel.

While American Dynasty was docked in Bellingham one crew member became ill and was taken to hospital. That crewman tested positive for COVID-19 and remains in hospital.

According to American Seafoods, all crew were tested for COVID-19 before boarding the vessel. Only those who tested negative for the virus were allowed to board.

The novel coronavirus may be an inconvenience for some but other individuals have more severe symptoms that can lead to permanent mental and physical impairment, or death. COVID-19 outbreaks and positive tests among workers have been reported by a dozen other companies.

The U.S. Coast Guard, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Seattle/King County Health Department, Whatcom County Health Department, and the Port of Seattle, are investigating and working with American Dynasty to determine how this outbreak happened and how future outbreaks can be prevented.

by Tom Evans, Injury at Sea. Continue Reading

COVID-19 outbreaks and positive tests among workers have been reported by Blue Harvest Fisheries, Bristol Seafood, Bornstein Seafoods, High Liner Foods, Ocean Beauty Seafoods, Pacific Seafood, Peter Pan Seafoods, Thai Union and Trident Seafoods.

Exposure occurs through personal contact in cramped living quarters and close working conditions. Social distancing guideline are impractical in meat and seafood processing plants and vessels.

The novel coronavirus may be an inconvenience for some but other individuals have more severe symptoms that can lead to permanent mental and physical impairment, or death.

The U.S. Coast Guard, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and county and port health officials are all investigating and working with these companies to determine future outbreaks can be prevented.

by Tom Evans, Injury at Sea. Continue Reading

The Coast Guard medevaced a crewman Thursday from the 905ft Alskan Navigator approximately 170 miles southwest of Cold Bay.

A Coast Guard helicopter crew from Kodiak hoisted the sick crewman at about 8 a.m. and flew him to Cold Bay where he was placed in the care of an awaiting LifeMed aircraft crew.

Coast Guard received the request at about 1 p.m. Wednesday to hoist the 61-year-old man experiencing abdominal pain from the 905-foot, U.S.-flagged, motor vessel Alaskan Navigator that was en route from Valdez to China, and approximately 270 miles southwest of Unalaska.

The Coast Guard requested that the Alaskan Navigator change course in order to meet the Coast Guard helicopter for the hoist.

The aircrew launched from Kodiak Wednesday, landed in Cold Bay to refuel, and launched to conduct the medevac at first light Thursday.

by Tom Evans, Injury at Sea. Continue Reading

Operational flights of Coast Guard aircraft continue as required, and crews and aircraft are ready to respond to any requests for assistance.

During the planning phase of every search and rescue or medical evacuation mission, Coast Guard District 17 follows protocols to determine potential survivor exposure to COVID-19. Air Station Kodiak maintains appropriate personal protective equipment for aircrews during missions and has decontamination procedures and equipment for the crews and aircraft upon their landing. This capability is deployable anywhere Coast Guard aircraft can land.

Kodiak Coast Guard personnel and their families remain focused on the health and well-being of the entire Kodiak community, especially during this pandemic crisis. Many Coast Guard family members are actively serving the local community as doctors, nurses, and other front line healthcare providers. Many Coast Guard dependents are serving as teachers and educators providing essential online education to the Kodiak community.

Active Duty members and their families are actively volunteering in the community by providing meals, delivering groceries, sewing cloth masks, and providing financial support to those in need.

Coast Guard senior leaders also are members of the Kodiak Emergency Services Committee and the Kodiak Economic Task Force, as well as serving as part of the Kodiak Incident Command System.

Coast Guard Air Station Kodiak remains ready to serve Alaskans and the United States, 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

by Tom Evans, Injury at Sea. Continue Reading

A crewman aboard the 181-foot Royal Canadian Navy Ship HMCS Nanaimo, transiting the northern section of Admiralty Inlet, sustained a head injury and symptoms of concussion after taking a fall. US Coast Guard crews hoisted the injured man from the Canadian naval vessel , Friday.

The crew of the Nanaimo reported that the man had a laceration on his head and showed signs of a concussion. The command center diverted a Coast Guard Air Station Port Angeles MH-65 Dolphin helicopter crew conducting training exercises nearby the location of the HMCS Nanaimo.

The aircrew, with the help of the Canadian crew members, put the injured man into a basket and hoisted him into the helicopter. The injured man was transported to Harbor View Medical Hospital, he was then transferred by ambulance to Virginia Mason Hospital to receive medical care.

by Tom Evans, Injury at Sea. Continue Reading

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